Mashed Potatoes

Just thinking about mashed potatoes makes me swoon—they’re so fluffy and belly-pleasing, mmm. But what’s not pleasing is all the butter, milk and cream that is typically added; I don’t want cow in my potatoes, thank you. Below you’ll find an easy recipe for basic mashed potatoes, as well as variations using curry, yams, and pistachios.

Mashed potatoes are so easy to make, and there are so many different ways to make them. Below is my basic recipe as well as recipes for mashed yams, and curried mashed potatoes. I was tipped off recently that pistachios are also very good in mashed potatoes, which is a new favorite twist of mine. But do not feel locked into these recipes; have fun with them and spice them up any way you like, and adjust the measurements to your tastes.

I prefer to use russet potatoes in my basic recipe, but you can also use Yukon Gold or red potatoes, which will be slightly heavier (if you don’t use russets, you may want to add another potato or two since russets are generally larger). I like to peel my potatoes first, because sometimes the skins when boiled impart a sour taste (in my opinion). But feel free to leave the peelings on if you like; you will get a more rugged, hearty texture.

I use a hand-held electric beater, but you can also use a manual, hand-held potato masher, or a potato ricer. A ricer pushes the potatoes through small holes, kind of like a large garlic press, which is believed to produce lighter, smoother mashed potatoes. I didn’t notice a big difference, and still prefer my electric beater.

These mashed potatoes are going to taste lighter than traditional recipes since they are without butter or milk, but the garlic and onion make up for it (lately I’ve been loving “toasted” onion granules). I typically use the cooking water during blending, but with the yams I use non-dairy milk, which complements the sweetness. However, cooking water or non-dairy milk is fine in any of these recipes.

Basic Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients
water
4 large russet potatoes, peeled
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon granulated onion
1/2 to 3/4 cup cooking water

Directions
1. Cut the potatoes into chunks. In a soup pot, cover the potatoes with water. Add the garlic powder and granulated onion, and bring to a boil. Boil on med-high until potatoes are soft and easily pierced with a fork and starting to fall apart, about 10-15 minutes.

2. Drain the potatoes and place into a large bowl (but keep the cooking water handy). Using a handheld electric beater, blend the potatoes on low, adding the cooking water gradually until you reach your desired consistency. Serve with pepper and chives, or finely chopped, cooked broccoli.

Pistachio Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients
water
4 large russet potatoes, peeled
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon granulated onion
1/3 cup pistachios
1/2 to 3/4 cup cooking water

Directions
1. Cut the potatoes into chunks. In a soup pot, cover the potatoes with water. Add the garlic powder and granulated onion, and bring to a boil. Boil on med-high until potatoes are soft and easily pierced with a fork and starting to fall apart, about 10-15 minutes.

2. Drain the potatoes and place into a large bowl (but keep the cooking water handy).

3. Using a high-speed blender, blend the pistachios with 1/2 cup of the cooking water until very smooth. Add to the bowl of potatoes. Using a handheld electric beater, blend the potatoes and pistachio mixture on low, adding additional cooking water until you reach your desired consistency. Serve with grated pistachios (as shown) using a rotary cheese grater (or finely chopped by hand).

Mashed Yams

Ingredients
water
2 large yams, peeled
1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional)
1/2 teaspoon granulated onion (optional)
1/2 to 3/4 cup non-dairy milk (or cooking water)

Directions
1. Cut the yams into chunks. In a soup pot, cover them with water. Add the garlic powder and granulated onion if using (you may choose not to if you like a sweeter taste), and bring to a boil. Boil on med-high until yams are soft and easily pierced with a fork and starting to fall apart, about 10-15 minutes.

2. Drain the yams and place into a large bowl. Using a handheld electric beater, blend the yams on low, adding the non-dairy milk (or cooking water) gradually until you reach your desired consistency. Serve with sliced or diced avocado and/or cinnamon.

Curried Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients
water
4 large russet potatoes, peeled
3 teaspoons curry powder
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon granulated onion
1/2 to 3/4 cup cooking water

Directions
1. Cut the potatoes into chunks. In a soup pot, cover the potatoes with water. Add the garlic powder, granulated onion and curry powder, and bring to a boil. Boil on med-high until potatoes are soft and easily pierced with a fork and starting to fall apart, about 10-15 minutes.

2. Drain the potatoes and place into a large bowl (but keep the cooking water handy). Using a handheld electric beater, blend the potatoes on low, adding the cooking water gradually until you reach your desired consistency.

For each of the four recipes:

Preparation: 10-15 minutes
Cooking time: 10-15 minutes
Serves: 4

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Comments

  1. Shasha28 says:

    I just started the Dr. Mcdougall program “The Starch Solution”. I’m eating potatoes everyday now which I love so no problem there. This is a good post and I will be trying these recipes to broaden the variety of potato dishes I make. Thanks.

  2. Thanks Shasha! I love potatoes too and eat them pretty much everyday. I hope you enjoy the recipes :) -Cathy

  3. Cathy, I was at True North for 2 weeks in April. Thank you for teaching me how easy it is to cook this way. I love your website, especially your pictures of what you eat. It reminds me again how easy this can be, yet still look and taste wonderful. I’ll try the mashed potatoes today.

  4. Thanks Janet! :) You’re so welcome. I hope you enjoyed the mashed potatoes! -C

  5. What is granulated onion?
    I have onion flakes and onion powder.
    Can these be used as substitution?
    Love the burgers recipe.
    I added bulgar grain and canned beets. Yummy!
    Realllly enjoy your helpful website.
    Thanks

  6. Hey Cathy, could I use regular onion and garlic instead of the powder kind?

    • Hi Julie, sure. It’s more flavorful if you saute the onion and garlic in a pan first (to release the sugars) than boiling them right in with the potatoes; but either will work. If you saute in a pan first, add the onion and garlic at the point of blending (not into the boiling water).

  7. elizabeth says:

    For your basic mashed potato, how many lbs is 4 large russet?

  8. elizabeth says:

    Thank you. I just put some potatoes in the pressure cooker with peeled cloves of garlic. I don’t usually use a beater, so I will this time. I hope to try the “toasted granulated onion” soon. Do you ever use a pressure cooker? Do you prefer garlic powder over fresh?

  9. Thanks for these great ideas! Try this: add brandy and a little frozen orange juice to mashed sweet potatoes! Delicious.

  10. I love the idea of putting the garlic and onion in the cooking water. It seems like that would impart a nice subtle flavor instead of putting the spices in afterward. I want to try the pistachio recipe first!

  11. Love your website!

  12. I’m passing it on to others to enjoy!
    Cheers, Bruce from sunny Qualicum Beach, B.C.

  13. I don’t see a hand-held electric beater in your Amazon store. Can you recommend one?

    • Thanks Susan, I’ll add one. I think you can get a good one for around $25. Good brands are Cuisinart, Oster and Kitchen Aid.

      • Thank you. I’m about as “new” as a newbie can get. I love your website though, with all the pictures and helpful hints.

  14. Just been reading both McDougall books (Max Weightloss and Starch Solution) so I was thrilled to find your website. It has a great layout and I’m super excited to try this recipe and many, many others! Thanks so much!

  15. Great website, Cathy! I wanted to ask a question about white potatoes…I thought they were in the same camp as the other “whites” (pasta, bread, rice) that should be avoided because they cause a spike in blood sugar and are so starchy. I’ve always heard a person should stick with the more nutritious sweet potatoes instead. Can you explain why my thinking may not be correct? Thank you!

  16. I made the mushroom gravy to go with this recipe. I’m practicing for Thanksgiving. Thanks!

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